Deviant Login Shop
 Join deviantART for FREE Take the Tour
×



Details

Submitted on
December 26, 2013
Image Size
2.1 MB
Resolution
1846×1200
Submitted with
Sta.sh
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
869
Favourites
48 (who?)
Comments
9
Downloads
6

Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS REBEL T2i
Shutter Speed
1/15 second
Aperture
F/3.5
Focal Length
18 mm
ISO Speed
3200
Date Taken
Dec 17, 2013, 9:19:38 PM
Software
Adobe Photoshop CS6 (Macintosh)
Sensor Size
8mm
×
Celtic Knotwork Cedar Cane by Fandragon Celtic Knotwork Cedar Cane by Fandragon
My Christmas present to my dad this year. His balance needs a little help lately, so he and my mom asked if I could make him a cane. At first I had grand plans of trudging through the wilderness to find an oak sapling to hew down and carve into fantastical shapes. I eventually admitted to myself that you honestly do need to let wood cure for a while (say, a YEAR) if you don't want wood fibers that are still springy to suddenly split apart when someone puts weight on it. Someone like my FATHER. So I went with a rough cedar cane my mother-in-law found for me years ago, at a craft festival where someone was demonstrating a woodworking jig that would carve a piece of wood into a spiral shape. (Here's a good example of what it looked like before I started: www.dutchcrafters.com/Amish-Ha… .) The twist on the one I had ended about eight inches from the top, so I whittled the twist to extend a little higher, and then shaped the top into a sphere. The knotwork design is based on a LOT of google image searches, and all that tiny detail made me glad I'd gone with cedar instead of oak. Cedar's soft, and it makes for some very nice-smelling sawdust.

Funny story: I found out just before shipping this to my dad that I'd cut the cane about three inches too short. (A cane used for balance is generally taller than a cane used to support a weak limb. Who knew?) After about twenty minutes of PANIC, I used a 3/8 inch drill bit to hollow out the pice I'd cut off, and about three inches of the main cane. Insert wooden dowel, pour in the glue, clamp the pieces tightly for about a day, and then sand everything smooth. You can still see the join in the picture, but on the whole I'm happy with how easy that was to fix. And I used an oak dowel, so I can honestly say I made an oak-hearted staff. Sounds surprisingly Tolkien, so I'll go with that :)
Add a Comment:
 
:iconbanjobx7:
banjoBX7 Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
Beautiful work
Reply
:iconfandragon:
Fandragon Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2013
Thank you!
Reply
:iconbicnarok:
Bicnarok Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
That is fantastic.

I've often tried to carve wood from the forest when I was bored on holiday, I didn't realize it had to cure for a year so no wonder I failed.
Reply
:iconfandragon:
Fandragon Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2013
Well, a year's probably the longest you'd have to wait. It doesn't always mess up the wood if you carve it right away, but there's a chance if you don't let it dry evenly then some pieces will dry faster than others and split off. If you let it sit for at least a few months you'll be able to work around places where the wood cracked while drying :)
Reply
:iconbicnarok:
Bicnarok Featured By Owner Dec 28, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks for the info, might give it anther go:)
Reply
:iconbuttermitsahne:
buttermitsahne Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2013
That is a  amazing piece of art!
Reply
:iconfandragon:
Fandragon Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2013
Thanks!
Reply
:iconkitty-grin:
Kitty-Grin Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
that's so cool, I think you are very talented and your father is quite lucky to have someone so talented.
Reply
:iconfandragon:
Fandragon Featured By Owner Dec 27, 2013
Thank you!
Reply
Add a Comment: